Vacuum Sealer

lightflyer1

Active Member
May 2, 2015
883
93
There really isn't any need to seal and pull a vacuum on ammo, unless you are storing in under some sort of wet conditions.

There has been mucho mil-surp ammo that was stored in cool dry locations for decades that still works just like it did when manufactured.
Just repacked thousands of rounds of this into 50 cal ammo cans plus a desiccant bag I saved from other stuff. Easier to handle than a giant wooden crate.
 

Axxe55

Professional Troublemaker
Dec 15, 2019
5,737
113
Texas.
Just repacked thousands of rounds of this into 50 cal ammo cans plus a desiccant bag I saved from other stuff. Easier to handle than a giant wooden crate.
If the seal on the ammo can isn't damaged, you can keep ammo for many years in them. They were designed for the military for some pretty bad environments and climates.
 

MikeyJ

Active Member
Feb 2, 2016
214
63
Tomball
Just repacked thousands of rounds of this into 50 cal ammo cans plus a desiccant bag I saved from other stuff. Easier to handle than a giant wooden crate.
Don't forget to "recharge" the desiccant from time to time. It can only hold so much moisture.
 

lightflyer1

Active Member
May 2, 2015
883
93
Bought the cans from Walmart when they were on sale for $8. Seem to work as designed and seal in place. Changing the desiccant shouldn't be much of an issue if the seal works. With no air exchange no more moisture can get in and the desiccant should remove what is there and hold it. Just my opinion.
 

Axxe55

Professional Troublemaker
Dec 15, 2019
5,737
113
Texas.
Don't forget to "recharge" the desiccant from time to time. It can only hold so much moisture.
Unless the seal is damaged, or compromised, there should be no reason to have to "recharge" the desiccant. I used old ammo cans without any desiccant and never had any issues with moisture.
 

MikeyJ

Active Member
Feb 2, 2016
214
63
Tomball
Unless the seal is damaged, or compromised, there should be no reason to have to "recharge" the desiccant. I used old ammo cans without any desiccant and never had any issues with moisture.
Maybe I wasn't clear. The post I was responding to mentioned reusing desiccant bags "saved from other stuff". If the desiccant is sitting around in the open air for a while, it will pick up moisture and won't do any good drying out a sealed container. As you point out, if the seals are good, you don't need to worry about recharging the dessicant -- as long as the desiccant is in good shape to begin with.
 

JamesFinTexas

New Member
Aug 2, 2020
12
3
75023
Been using a vacuum sealer for years.

Found a deer shoulder from 2014 in the bottom of my freezer last year.

Vacuum bag was intact and the shoulder was just fine. Zero freezer burn and tasted great.
5 year old meat that was stored like you did is impressive.
 

lightflyer1

Active Member
May 2, 2015
883
93
Maybe I wasn't clear. The post I was responding to mentioned reusing desiccant bags "saved from other stuff". If the desiccant is sitting around in the open air for a while, it will pick up moisture and won't do any good drying out a sealed container. As you point out, if the seals are good, you don't need to worry about recharging the dessicant -- as long as the desiccant is in good shape to begin with.

You are correct in what you say. But I save these and plan on reusing them. I don't leave them in the garage on a shelf in the open air. Dried and sealed in a jar until reuse.
 
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