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How did they preserve meat in the past?

Discussion in 'Food, Water Storage and other Prepper Gear' started by sobi1998, Apr 7, 2020.

  1. sobi1998

    sobi1998 Active Member

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    Call me ignorant but how did they preserve meat in the olden days? I.E. pre-modern-refrigeration. I know you can salt meat as a preservation technique. Or you can let a hard outer layer dry on the meat.
    So if SHTF and powers out, how do you make a deer/hog last a week or more?


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  2. FireInTheWire

    FireInTheWire Ego kills talent TGT Supporter

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    Salt. How??? not sure.

     
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  3. Sam Colt

    Sam Colt Active Member

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    Salting, drying, and canning.
     
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  4. toddnjoyce

    toddnjoyce TGT Addict

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  5. sobi1998

    sobi1998 Active Member

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    Forgot about canning
    If I was alone in the woods surviving I’d probably end up more wasteful
    If I was with my family in the same situation, we could probably finish an average hog in 1-2 days
    69b82d81d68f14673b38f6c45c42e544.jpg
    Got this 125 pound sow a couple weeks ago
    Smoked a ham and it lasted me about 4-5 days conservatively
    To be less wasteful, i guess shoot the smaller ones...


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  6. baboon

    baboon TGT Addict

    Confit
    Confit as a cooking term describes when food is cooked in grease, oil or sugar water (syrup), at a lower temperature, as opposed to deep frying. While deep frying typically takes place at temperatures of 160–230 °C (325–450 °F), confit preparations are done at a much lower temperature, such as an oil temperature of around 90 °C (200 °F), sometimes even cooler. The term is usually used in modern cuisine to mean long slow cooking in oil or fat at low temperatures, many having no element of preservation such as dishes like confit potatoes.

    In meat cooking, this requires the meat to be salted as part of the preservation process. After salting and cooking in the fat, sealed and stored in a cool, dark place, confit can last for several months or years. Confit is a specialty of southwestern france.

    My dad told stories of grandma putting up pork chops that came out of a crock covered in lard. Duck & goose meat Confit is common too mostly down are leg quarters.
     
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  7. thescoutranch

    thescoutranch TN Transplant - Loving TX

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    I have canned venison before and it worked great. My mother would can beef all the time. Easy to do, just follow the rules.
     
  8. sobi1998

    sobi1998 Active Member

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    Did you add a liquid stock or how was it done? I’ve only canned pickles and veggies


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  9. thescoutranch

    thescoutranch TN Transplant - Loving TX

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    It has been a couple years but if I remember right I just added water halfway up the jar after the meat was already in packed down. When you use the pressure canner, the meat will fill the rest of the jar with juices. You end up with a jar of meat that is so tender; it is perfect for uses in sandwiches and stews
     
  10. baboon

    baboon TGT Addict

    Speaking of curing hams my chef buddy studied Caricature. One time while on a major port wine buzz he started talking about a Culatello ham.


    https://www.saveur.com/culatello-italian-ham/
     


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