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2ManyGuns

Revolver's, get one, shoot the snot out of it!
Lifetime Member
Jan 31, 2010
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Somewhere in Texas!
Might just have to try that.

My new neighbors youngest son has been wanting to make his momma a small garden for her birthday/Mother's day. We started a couple of weeks back, we were slowed down by the rain. Built a small 8 X 18 for her, I had some more pallets here, we used those for fencing, built a tomato and green bean trellis. I had started him some summer squash and tomatoes in pots. I showed him yesterday how to transplant those and planted pole beans and some yellow bush beans, Today, his momma was out there with him, and they planted some purple hull peas and I gave them a couple of dozen of traveling onions.

We amended the top 6 inches of soil with a little 13-13-13, some Epsom salt, azomite, coffee grounds, about a 1/2 inch of mushroom mulch mixed well. Below this, we had dug down about 12 inches and placed tree branches, shrub trimmings, and grass clippings. This was to create a long-term enrichment of the soil and help with moisture retention. It was good to see a young man (23 YO) trying to kick some bad habits (nearly a year clean, but when he is not occupied, he feels the cravings), working at something to help his family and give him something to keep busy with. He's a good kid, just has made some stupid decisions, and he is trying really hard to fight those former addictions.
 

glenbo

Active Member
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Sep 3, 2014
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San Leon
Harvesting wild yeast is relatively easy, but it doesn't perform half as well as commercial yeast. The only way I've found that you can get anywhere close to a good strain is if you keep a starter going for ages and ages. It takes about a month after putting the jar out for the thing to ferment to where it's mostly yeast and you've got to watch it really closely because lactic acid bacteria can build up if you let it go for too long.

That being said, if you gather a few different strains from different areas, combining them can produce a pretty solid yeast for making bread with.
And here's another way:

 

no2gates

Defund Gun Control !
TGT Supporter
Aug 31, 2013
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Grand Prairie, TX

2ManyGuns

Revolver's, get one, shoot the snot out of it!
Lifetime Member
Jan 31, 2010
1,201
113
Somewhere in Texas!
Cucumbers are putting on finally, I even found a few watermelons about the size of a small cantaloupe. After seeing the weather warnings on my phone, I decided to dig up the remainder of my potatoes, 4 more 5-gallon buckets. Lavaca County is 3 miles away from me, with the flash flood warnings and the expected heavy rains in my area, my thoughts were better to get as many as I can, I would hate for them to rot. I would say this is the best yield ever, about 130 pounds( I finally did a weigh-in) in less than 100 square feet. About a third were just a bit smaller than softball size, the remainder in the baseball and golfball range.

Next, I will prepare 2 beds for another attempt at sweet corn, different seed, and a bed for Okra. I still have a good chance at making a good crop of each.
 

2ManyGuns

Revolver's, get one, shoot the snot out of it!
Lifetime Member
Jan 31, 2010
1,201
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Somewhere in Texas!
Update on the corn and okra. The corn is already 4 to 6 inches in height, my earlier in the growing season attempt with a 98% failure rate has gone to a 98% success in germination rate. Today I hilled some soil around the base of the corn since it is a "shallow root" plant and it is in raised beds, color is very green and vibrant. Okra germination is equally impressive, with only 3 seeds not germinating, it is only about 2 inches tall at this point.

Earlier I planted 12 sweet potato slips, 9 have survived, 3 of those had been savagely ravaged by snails, but they are finally sending out some leaves! Snail bait helped dramatically.

I had planted 20 strawberry plants in nursery pots, 6 survived. For some reason, the other 14 had been growing nicely, then started browning and died a wretched death. Those 6 survivors have now been relocated to raised beds, where the runners can take root and make more strawberry goodness! Of the 20 I planted in the earlier pictured strawberry planter, 19 have survived. The first year's yield was not great by any means, but I am hoping the next 3 to 5 years will show improvement as there will be more plants. one of my next projects is to build a second planter.

Zucchini season is about over for this planting, maybe a week or 2 left and they will be done. Then purple hull peas will be planted in the bed, I have planted (yesterday) a first crop where my kale and collards had been. Two weeks' succession is about right.

I am looking forward to my first harvest of Crimson Sweet watermelon, the largest at this time is about the size of a soccer ball, these normally range in size from 20 to 35 pounds, smaller ripened melons are not uncommon though. The vine attached to the melons is still plump and green, and not ready for harvest.

In case I have not mentioned in a prior post, I have planted 2 Razmataz Grapes, these are doing well and are about 18 inches tall. I only planted 2 so I could see how they would grow in my soil. Besides, yields for this variety are supposed to be 40 to 60 pounds throughout its season at maturity! My ultimate goal is to make raisins (seedless) and to eat fresh.

The 2 black raspberries I planted are coming along nicely, the one that sent shoots up first is nearly 30 inches tall with the second at about 18. 3 of the 4 blueberry plants have departed this plane of existence, I will not be buying more. If the last plant survives I will try rooting cuttings and propagate that way. I have spent nearly $200 on blueberry plants, my soil is not right, I will try adding some sulfur (on order) and make it more acidic.
 

lightflyer1

Well-Known
May 2, 2015
1,502
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All three of my strawberry plants died like yours. Looked very green and healthy and started to put out fruit and then withered and died.
 

2ManyGuns

Revolver's, get one, shoot the snot out of it!
Lifetime Member
Jan 31, 2010
1,201
113
Somewhere in Texas!
Garden update, with all of the rain my garden has been struck very hard. I have removed the yellow squash, zucchini, kale, potted beans, and cucumbers that have all wilted and died. I have replanted yellow squash, transplanted rooted vine sections of the sweet potatoes to another bed, so now I have 2 beds, and I have planted 2 beds with cowpeas, with about 3 weeks between for staggering the yield. The okra now stands close to 4 feet in height and is getting ready to set blooms.

Other preps, with the suggestion of possible serious inflation and shortages, I have added to my reserve today.

75 lbs each of rice and flour, 2 70 oz. dried milk, 20 pounds of complete pancake mix, 12 cans of mushrooms for use in rice casseroles, 16 cans each of Cream of Mushroom and Chicken soup, 24 cans of Ranch style beans (makes a simple and quick meal over rice), 24 cans each of corn and green beans, 18 quarts of shelf-stable almond milk, 18 large cans of chicken, 8 lbs of Velveta to use with casseroles, 36 lbs. of pasta, 30 lbs. of sugar, 4 qts. lemon juice (canning and make lemonade), 10+ lbs of coffee, corn starch for cooking, 16 cans of peaches (for baking or dessert), 3+ lbs baking powder and some other rice and pasta sides. Of course the much-needed TP and Paper Towels.

Some of the rice and flour (50 lbs each) will be stored in bulk 5-gallon containers in sealed mylar bags, the remainder will be separated into smaller 1-gallon bags, the sugar, dried milk, and pasta will be in smaller bags as well all will have O2 absorbers.

These are common-use items for me and will not be wasted.
 

2ManyGuns

Revolver's, get one, shoot the snot out of it!
Lifetime Member
Jan 31, 2010
1,201
113
Somewhere in Texas!
I was tired from the long week and I have been recovering from a back injury, so far just had some steroids for the back, hopefully not too serious. So I slept in this morning, till 10:30 am, (I woke up at 6:45 am, had some breakfast, and went back to bed).

(12:45 pm) I have so far packaged for long-term storage 50 pounds of the rice in 1-gallon mylar bags w/ 500cc O2 absorber (10 cups per bag) and 36 pounds of long pasta (spaghetti 4 lbs per gallon bag) w/ O2 absorbers as well. I leave the pasta in its original plastic sleeve, cut a small hole in it so the O2 absorber can more readily suck up the O2, with the added benefit of having cook time and nutrition info on each sleeve. The bags are 7.5 mil and resealable. After inserting everything, I use the ziploc to close them and then seal them with an impulse sealer. Back to work!

Quit for the day, packaged and sealed an additional 30 lbs of sugar and 10 lbs of Buttermilk Complete Pancake mix. Then put those bags into food-grade 5-gallon buckets. I may finish tomorrow, I really need to make a run for non-iodized salt and some dry cereals to package for long-term storage, as well as some meats to can into ready-to-eat stews and soups.
 
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2ManyGuns

Revolver's, get one, shoot the snot out of it!
Lifetime Member
Jan 31, 2010
1,201
113
Somewhere in Texas!
Since my back was feeling better, after the second round of steroids, I spent the morning working in the garden. I have fallen behind in weeding and removing the veggies that have finished their season. Today I cleaned four raised beds and planted (as seeds) kale, carrots, zucchini, and yellow wax beans, I also weeded out the okra bed. I still have a lot to weed, but I do not want to push my back yet.
 
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