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Case length question

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by unicom, Mar 7, 2020.

  1. unicom

    unicom Active Member

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    I’m sure that would help me. But I need overall experience and knowledge as well. I know I’m going to goof up some rounds before I get it right.


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  2. Younggun

    Younggun Ginger Avenger TGT Supporter Admin

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    hill co.
    I don’t see how. The case neck is obviously deformed. It’s not a sizing issue.


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  3. rotor

    rotor Active Member

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    You full length size a case, you plop into a case gauge, if it works you load that one case as a dummy round short of primer and powder, you plop the final cartridge into the Lyman ammo checker. If it is good you have a sammi spec cartridge. At most you have used one brass and one bullet and if you want you can pull the bullet and not waste anything. Some people want to reload a brass that is specific to one rifle, I understand but it you just want sammi spec ammo, the above works. Note an ammo checker may find a bad cartridge that a case gauge does not find (like in these if there is a bulge).

    Of course, I am very very cautious when I reload and I put everything I make through at least a case gauge. That is me though. I do not do the barrel plunk test. Hornady makes some really nice header gauges but I have not used them. These gauges are not super expensive and for a lazy guy like myself, I would rather plop into a gauge than try to measure everything with a caliper. If I buy a set of dies I buy at least a case gauge, Wilson or Lyman. Makes adjusting dies so much easier and I am confident that my ammo meets specs before I run a batch through. You-tube is your friend here.
     
  4. Younggun

    Younggun Ginger Avenger TGT Supporter Admin

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    hill co.
    I know what they do. I just don’t think it’s necessary for this situation. It’s something that’s obvious and OP seemed more concerned with cause. Not the answer to the OPs question, IMO.

    That said, if someone wants to use them I won’t say they’re wasting money. It all depends on your goal. I load dummy rounds similar to your method, but it’s usually for checking throat length or keeping a dummy with a specific bullet loaded in case I need a reference to COAL (or to ogive to be more precise) since I load to it the rifle and my loads are usually not in spec.


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  5. rotor

    rotor Active Member

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    There were several answers to ops question and I am not sure which one would be correct. My answer tells me that when I make a completed round I have a sammi spec shell and that I have properly adjusted my dies and sized my case properly. I am a simple person and like simple easy to follow procedures. Most beginners should look for something that tell them easily "yes that is good". I have been reloading for 7 years and am still a beginner. I still have a lot of learning to go though and I do not reload for any one specific rifle and realize that reloading for one rifle is different in the resizing step.
     
  6. popper

    popper Active Member

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    Case gauge is good to verify (!) case size. Does nothing about neck OD or COAL. FCD for crimp just to remove bell of mouth. If neck tension is good no need to crimp for ar15. I advise making shorter dummies to start chamber check, increase in 10-20 thous. steps. Else you get to pogo the bolt open. I got one of NOE nose size inserts to check neck OD (330) as my chamber is tight. Check them all like plunk test for pistol. I set my sizer die for the chamber, drop in chamber gauge and feeler gauge to see where the base is (for long chamber). Write it down so I can reset my sizer if anything happens - like pounding out a stuck case.
     
  7. rotor

    rotor Active Member

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    Case gauge is used to set the resizing die and once properly set the gauge tells you if your case is too long or too short and whether you have the datum line properly set. Case gauge does NOT tell you neck OD or COAL. That's where an ammo checker comes in. I make only sammi spec cartridges, not for any one specific gun. Those that want super accuracy need to follow above advice, you may or may not have sammi spec ammo. That is one of the big advantages of reloading, you can make ammo that is tailored to your specific rifle.
     
  8. Deavis

    Deavis Active Member

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    Simple rule that will serve you well. If it has a cannelure, crimp into it. If it does not, just remove the bell, i.e. .001" below SAAMI spec. Belling wont hurt anything and it makes seating everything easier, including boattail bullets. Chamfering is belling by a different name it just involves removing material instead of relocating it. You only need to be able to start the bullet, nothing more.

    If you choose to roll crimp, learn to tell the difference between light, medium, heavy, and over crimped. You know what the last one looks like so only 3 to go!
     
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