BEDLINERS FOR PICKUPS

leVieux

Old Guy "Lost my guns in move to nursing home."
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Mar 28, 2013
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YOU DON'T WANT A BLACK ONE !

Being old and being a lifetime airplane guy, I watched the very birth of "bed-liners".

For decades, certain airplanes have had "wing-walk" areas, which were usually sections of a wing-root which had extra bracing intended to strengthen the wing, but secondarily indicating a safe place to put one's foot.

To provide non-slip surface for these small areas, and as an indicator of "where to put one's foot", a black non-glare, non-slip material was painted on.

As this coating was known to provide protection from dents & dings, aircraft mechanics, FBO's & paint shops began painting their truck beds with them. This caught-on, and soon gave birth the "bed-liner" industry. The painted-on coatings prevailed over the "slide-in" competitors as those trapped water and promoted rapid rusting-out of steel truck beds.

All that is fine, and provided help to truckers in many ways.

BUT, Why all BLACK? That was just continuing the tradition from aircraft, and was minimally cheaper to make.

Now, for those in Alaska and the Yukon or Siberia, black may be a wise choice.

BUT, in our Gulf Coast and Texas Summer heat, the black becomes so hot that any skin touching it would be burned. Even the toughened feet of dogs is injured by the hot black.

Sadly, many manufacturers have been offering factory bed liners, but only in BLACK.

By now, there are several competitors providing alternative colors on our aftermarket. One of my favorites is the "SkorpionKote", which comes in numerous color options, including light shades of tan & gray, even white & off-white.

For anyone actually using their truck beds in our heat, I suggest checking on those with lighter choices. Not only do they look a lot better, but they are much, much more comfortable during our long Hot Seasons. They can be customized to blend-in with, or to accentuate your truck's color schemes. I have had two white trucks with tan interiors done in tan SkorpionKote to match the interiors; they drew many compliments.

I hope you find this useful.

leVieux
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Texasjack

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I've had spray-in bed liners in the last 3 trucks I've owned, and have been extremely happy with it. The new stuff can be sprayed in to match the color of the truck. They also have an additive that will keep it shiny (if that appeals to you). I remember when the old drop-in versions were popular - polyethylene or fiberglass. They were terrible and rarely fit the truck.

One suggestion to anyone buying a truck: Look up the spray-in liner business and have them do the job, do not let the dealership talk you into buying it through them. They take it to the same outside business, but the markup is 3 to 4 times what the business will charge you.
 

1911'S 4 Me

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I knew a man that was given a truck from his fil. He rebuilt the truck, sprayed the bed liner, what was left he used in the interior floor for sound deadening.
 

Grumps21

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Spray in liners do little to keep dents at bay, but they do look better than a scratched up painted bed. I’m thinking some of the newer trucks may have galvanized panels - any body guys here know any different? Myself, I have a spray in liner that the dealer added, (was a CPO so most likely to cover up scratches in the bed) and a bed mat on the floor to provide a flatter, more slip resistant surface.
If I were to use my truck bed where I was throwing heavy stuff in or had heavy cargo bouncing around back there, I’d go the route of a drop in liner. They do the best in protecting the inner fenders and bed walls from getting beat up with dents. For my light suburban use, the spray in liner wins
 

pronstar

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Spray in liners do little to keep dents at bay, but they do look better than a scratched up painted bed. I’m thinking some of the newer trucks may have galvanized panels - any body guys here know any different? Myself, I have a spray in liner that the dealer added, (was a CPO so most likely to cover up scratches in the bed) and a bed mat on the floor to provide a flatter, more slip resistant surface.
If I were to use my truck bed where I was throwing heavy stuff in or had heavy cargo bouncing around back there, I’d go the route of a drop in liner. They do the best in protecting the inner fenders and bed walls from getting beat up with dents. For my light suburban use, the spray in liner wins

The latest beds are 100% composite.
Dent and scratch resistant

I agree with your liner comment…but I think we’re in the minority, most folks like the spray liners.


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Sasquatch

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ANY metal, plastic, or composite surface if left in direct sunlight during a hot day is going to be hot. I spent 16 years towing, jump starting, and breaking into cars, rain, shine, hot or cold. It doesn't matter if its black, white, shiny, matte - metal and plastic absorb and hold heat. You'll burn your hand or leg skin on a hot day if you touch any of that for more than a few seconds. If you have to mess around with anything automotive-wise on a sunny day (Even if the air temp isn't high) its wise to wear some mechanics type gloves at least, and long pants.

I see tow operators here that wear shorts on the sunny days and I cringe for them. I made that mistake as a rookie driver and got some second degree burns on my legs for the trouble. Whatever the air temperature is, you can count on the pavement to be quite a bit hotter - and quite a lot more unforgiving to exposed skin. It sucks from a comfort standpoint - but I learned to wear long pants and use knee pads, along with gloves and long sleeves when appropriate. If going into under brush to fetch a car that went off road, even in the hottest summer days I'd suit up in my coveralls.

Carhartts or similar thick cotton pants were the best at keeping the burn at bay, while making you sweat your ass off while doing it. Even thinner pants are better than bare skin on hot metal or asphalt (or concrete)
 
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